L'Abrie de Dieu Safe House


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History

Our name, L’Abrie de Dieu, means 'God’s Shelter'. Our shelter that supports physically, emotionally and sexually abused women and children by facilitating a restorative program in order to give a hope and future.

The organisation was established in 2006 as a response to the high levels of violence against women and children as was experienced specifically in the Stellenbosch court. A need for a safe house and shelter was recognised and this organisation strives to provide such a place. Violence against women and children has become endemic in South African society. L’Abrie de Dieu Safe House Stellenbosch attempts to counteract this scourge that seems to pervade our society and robs people of their dignity. We feel that it is the primary responsibility and duty of a civilised society to protect their vulnerable citizens against abuse.

Vision and mission

Our Vision

To be a shelter that supports physically, emotionally and sexually abused women and children by facilitating a restorative program in order to give a hope and future.

Mission

L’Abrie de Dieu Safe House Stellenbosch is a place of refuge for abused women and children. We strive to provide protection, comfort, support and healing in a homely Christian environment, restoring body, soul and spirit.

Intake criteria

  • Victims of Domestic violence from Winelands and Greater Stellenbosch Municipal district.
  • No drug or alcohol addiction
  • No boys over 10yrs

Success story

His name is Salakile.

Six years old and mildly mentally disabled, his autism a barrier between himself and the world. Salakile came to the Safe House with poor verbal skills and disorganised speech. It was especially difficult for him to express his feelings and emotions— which could be extreme at times. Incapable of verbalising his frustrations and pain, he would scream, cry, strike out and throw tantrums. And because he was unable tell us what was wrong, we were bewildered at how to help.

The Social Worker organised a tutor to ease his personal torment, she began to work with him to help him put words to his emotions. When he was calm, they would spend time in therapy identifying the different faces on an emotion chart— sad, angry, happy —and what they felt like and what they meant.

As a group, the staff helped his mother to help him learn the vocabulary he needed to express himself. By the time he left the Safe House, his mother was dramatically more capable of assisting him to communicate his feelings, and he had learned to ask for what he needed. He was a very different boy than the tormented one who first walked through our doors.

Today, this family revels in the changes birthed from our support.

From engaging events to life-changing healing, Your donations have made an extraordinary impact.

This is part of your legacy –because you cared enough to give.